One Book One Broomfield part 2

The wait is over, and this blog update is overdue, the 2014 One Book One Broomfield (OBOB) choice is Blood Memory by Margaret Coel. This year the committee selected two books, Coel’s fictional work Blood Memory and her non-fiction work Chief Left Hand. Each title deals in its own way with the Sand Creek Massacre and its aftermath.

blood memoryBlood Memory is a mystery set in Denver that follows Catherine McLeod, investigative reporter for the “Journal,” one of Denver’s major newspapers. Her recent coverage of the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes filing a claim for twenty-seven million acres of their ancestral lands has made her the target for assassination. Her investigation uncovers a conspiracy involving her ex-husband’s wealthy family and state politicians. As Catherine unravels the truth, she discovers some startling facts about her own heritage, making her would-be killer all the more desperate to find her.

Chief Left Hand recounts the life of the Arapaho chief, diplomat, and linguist, describes the experiences of his tribe during the nineteenth century, and discusses the Sand Creek Massacre.

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The library has many events planned to tie in with the OBOB, culminating in a talk and book signing from Margaret Coel on Saturday, November 8. Follow this link for all the events:

http://www.ci.broomfield.co.us/index.aspx?nid=2042

The library has also created a bibliography if you want to read more about Arapaho culture, land rights and the Sand Creek Massacre. Here’s the link to that:

http://www.ci.broomfield.co.us/DocumentCenter/View/8699

-Sarah BG

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One Book One Broomfield

The One Book One Broomfield announcement at the City Council meeting is only one short week away! On July 22, the Manager of Reference and Adult Services, Kathryn Lynip, will present the title (as well a copy of the book) to the City Council members.

A One Book program is a designed to get people in the community reading and discussing the same book at the same time. As with any book discussion, opinions will be varied. The programs have been growing in popularity and participation since the first one in 1998 when Seattle read The Sweet Hereafter. Broomfield began its program in 2006, with The Meadow by James Galvin. The selections since then have been The Greatest Generation, Breakfast with Buddha, Eventide, The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism, Healer and last year’s pick The Dog Stars.

What does this year hold for Broomfield and its readers? Tune in!

-Sarah BG